News Downloads Contact Us Email

Main Menu

Science News Headlines - Yahoo News

Back to news index

Unearthed essay on alien life reveals Churchill the scientist

FILE PHOTO: An alien world just two-thirds the size of Earth - one of the smallest on record - detected by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is seen in this NASA artist's illustrationBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - A newly unearthed essay by Winston Churchill shows Britain's wartime leader was uncannily prescient about the possibility of alien life on planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. The 11-page article was drafted on the eve of World War Two in 1939 and updated in the 1950s, decades before astronomers discovered the first extrasolar planets in the 1990s. The hunt for life on other worlds has taken off in the last 20 years as observations have suggested the Milky Way alone may contain more than a billion Earth-size planets that could be habitable. Churchill was already thinking along similar lines nearly 80 years ago, writing that "with hundreds of thousands of nebulae, each containing thousands of millions of suns, the odds are enormous that there must be immense numbers which possess planets whose circumstances would not render life impossible".


Fossils show quick rebound of life after ancient mass extinction

Handout of an artist's depiction of the diversified and complex Early Triassic marine ecosystem of southeastern IdahoBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fossils including sharks, sea reptiles and squid-like creatures dug up in Idaho reveal a marine ecosystem thriving relatively soon after Earth's worst mass extinction, contradicting the long-held notion life was slow to recover from the calamity. Scientists on Wednesday described the surprising fossil discovery showing creatures flourishing in the aftermath of the worldwide die-off at the end of the Permian Period about 252 million years ago that erased roughly 90 percent of species.


India launches record 104 satellites at one go

People watch as India's PSLV-C37 carrying 104 satellites in a single mission lifts off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in SriharikotaIndia successfully launched 104 satellites in a single mission on Wednesday, setting what its space agency says is a world record of launching the most satellites at one go. Of the 104, 101 are foreign satellites to serve international customers as the South Asian nation seeks a bigger share of the $300 billion global space industry. Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted his congratulations on the launch conducted by the state-run Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) that went off smoothly and was carried live on national TV news channels.


Fossil shows pregnant momma sea monster with developing embryo

DinocephalosaurusBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - An extraordinary fossil unearthed in southwestern China shows a pregnant long-necked marine reptile that lived millions of years before the dinosaurs with its developing embryo, indicating this creature gave birth to live babies rather than laying eggs. Scientists on Tuesday said the fossil of the unusual fish-eating reptile called Dinocephalosaurus, which lived about 245 million years ago during the Triassic Period, changes the understanding of the evolution of vertebrate reproductive systems. Dinocephalosaurus is the first member of a broad vertebrate group called archosauromorphs that includes birds, crocodilians, dinosaurs and extinct flying reptiles known as pterosaurs known to give birth this way, paleontologist Jun Liu of China's Hefei University of Technology said.


U.S. experts soften on DNA editing of human eggs, sperm, embryos

A file photo of a DNA double helix in an undated artist's illustration released by the National Human Genome Research Institute to ReutersBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Powerful gene editing tools may one day be used on human embryos, eggs and sperm to remove genes that cause inherited diseases, according to a report by U.S. scientists and ethicists released on Tuesday. The report from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Medicine said scientific advances make gene editing in human reproductive cells "a realistic possibility that deserves serious consideration.” The statement signals a softening in approach over the use of the technology known as CRISPR-Cas9 that has opened up new frontiers in genetic medicine because of its ability to modify genes quickly and efficiently. In December 2015, scientists and ethicists at an international meeting held at the NAS in Washington said it would be "irresponsible" to use gene editing technology in human embryos for therapeutic purposes, such as to correct genetic diseases, until safety and efficacy issues are resolved.


Endangered Antelopes Face 'Catastrophic' Die-Off

Endangered Antelopes Face 'Catastrophic' Die-OffA critically endangered species of antelope is dying by the thousands from a deadly infectious disease outbreak in Mongolia, and scientists fear there could be "catastrophic consequences" for the threatened animals and their ecosystem. Since December 2016, about 2,500 Mongolian saiga (Saiga tatarica mongolica) — a unique subspecies of saiga antelope — have died from a livestock virus. Scientists estimate the Mongolian saiga population to be about 10,000, meaning the deadly outbreak has killed about 25 percent of the endangered steppe-dwelling antelope.


Ancient 'Nessie' Delivered Live Baby Sea Monsters

Ancient 'Nessie' Delivered Live Baby Sea MonstersUntil now, researchers had thought that the fearsome marine reptile known as Dinocephalosaurus laid eggs, just as birds and crocodiles (its distant relatives) do. "This is the first-ever evidence of live birth in an animal group previously thought to lay eggs exclusively," said the study's lead researcher, Jun Liu, an associate professor of paleontology at the Hefei University of Technology in China. Researchers discovered the specimen of the pregnant Dinocephalosaurus in southwestern China's Luoping Biota National Geopark in 2008.


Looming Octopus 'Dances' in Winning Underwater Photo

Looming Octopus 'Dances' in Winning Underwater PhotoA vibrant and striking photo of an octopus spreading its tentacles in an Indian Ocean tide pool won diver Gabriel Barathieu the title of Underwater Photographer of the Year (UPY) 2017. Over just two days, a panel of three judges pared down the entries to 100 finalists, according to UPY jury chair Peter Rowlands, publisher of Underwater Photography magazine. "From my own point of view, I have been captivated not only by the winning images but also by the stories behind how those images were achieved," Rowlands said in the statement.


Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff Bezos

Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff BezosEarly Monday (Nov. 23), the private spaceflight company Blue Origin made a major stride in the pursuit of fully reusable rockets, when it launched an uncrewed vehicle into space and then soft-landed the rocket booster on the ground. "It was one of the greatest moments of my life," said Jeff Bezos, Blue Origin's founder, speaking about the landing in a press briefing yesterday (Nov. 24). "And my teammates here at Blue Origin, I could see felt the same way.


Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in Space

Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in SpaceThanksgiving in space will be a lot like the holiday down here on the ground — minus the gravity, of course. Like most Americans, NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren have Thanksgiving (Nov. 26) off, and they'll spend the day aboard the International Space Station (ISS) watching football and enjoying a turkey-centric feast, agency officials said. Kelly and Lindgren gave viewers a look at that feast in a special Thanksgiving video this week, breaking out bags of smoked turkey, rehydratable corn, candied yams and potatoes au gratin.


AP, HHMI collaborate on expanded science, health coverage

AP, HHMI collaborate on expanded science, health coverageThe Associated Press is teaming up with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education to expand its coverage of science, medicine and health journalism. The initial collaboration ...


Unearthed essay on alien life reveals Churchill the scientist

FILE PHOTO: An alien world just two-thirds the size of Earth - one of the smallest on record - detected by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is seen in this NASA artist's illustrationBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - A newly unearthed essay by Winston Churchill shows Britain's wartime leader was uncannily prescient about the possibility of alien life on planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. The 11-page article was drafted on the eve of World War Two in 1939 and updated in the 1950s, decades before astronomers discovered the first extrasolar planets in the 1990s. The hunt for life on other worlds has taken off in the last 20 years as observations have suggested the Milky Way alone may contain more than a billion Earth-size planets that could be habitable. Churchill was already thinking along similar lines nearly 80 years ago, writing that "with hundreds of thousands of nebulae, each containing thousands of millions of suns, the odds are enormous that there must be immense numbers which possess planets whose circumstances would not render life impossible".


Unearthed essay on alien life reveals Churchill the scientist

A statue of former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill stands in front of a view of the Houses of Parliament in LondonBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - A newly unearthed essay by Winston Churchill shows Britain's wartime leader was uncannily prescient about the possibility of alien life on planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. The 11-page article was drafted on the eve of World War Two in 1939 and updated in the 1950s, decades before astronomers discovered the first extrasolar planets in the 1990s. The hunt for life on other worlds has taken off in the last 20 years as observations have suggested the Milky Way alone may contain more than a billion Earth-size planets that could be habitable. Churchill was already thinking along similar lines nearly 80 years ago, writing that "with hundreds of thousands of nebulae, each containing thousands of millions of suns, the odds are enormous that there must be immense numbers which possess planets whose circumstances would not render life impossible".


Giants' Mark Melancon: a closer who's open to sports science

Giants' Mark Melancon: a closer who's open to sports scienceMark Melancon sprints to the mound and his heart starts racing — at precisely 183 beats per minute. It's all by careful design for San Francisco's new closer. "I didn't realize it was that high," ...


Magma Power: Scientists Drill into Volcano to Harness its Energy

Magma Power: Scientists Drill into Volcano to Harness its EnergyIt's not every day that scientists can study a volcano up close, but researchers investigating the feasibility of volcano-powered electricity successfully drilled into the core of one in Iceland. Scientists studied the volcanic system at Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland, which has been dormant for more than 700 years, according to a hazard assessment by Verkis Consulting Engineers for Invest in Inceland. The depths of Reykjanes' geothermal field — an area with high heat flow — had never been explored, researchers with the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) said in a statement.


Sick Beats: Scientists Revive Hearts to Study Erratic Rhythms

Sick Beats: Scientists Revive Hearts to Study Erratic RhythmsThe cameras track electrical impulses to identify sources of signal disruptions that can make hearts beat too slowly, too quickly, or out of rhythm. The rhythm is set by synchronized pumping in the heart's two upper chambers, called the atria, and in its two lower chambers, called the ventricles. Disruptions in the heart's electrical system can cause abnormal beating, or arrhythmia.


Dark Science: Total Solar Eclipse Gives Researchers Brief Window

Dark Science: Total Solar Eclipse Gives Researchers Brief WindowDuring the Aug. 21, 2017 total solar eclipse, 11 teams of NASA-sponsored researchers will soak up as much science as they can — in less than 3 minutes. A total solar eclipse is a rare and unique event. When the disc of the moon completely covers the sun, it reveals previously hidden features of the star and casts Earth into a strange, otherworldly twilight in affected areas.


'The Space Between Us': The Science Behind the Science Fiction

'The Space Between Us': The Science Behind the Science Fiction"The Space Between Us" may be a science-fiction film, but the science behind the story is a lot more factual than it may seem. The movie tells the story of the first child to be born on Mars, after an astronaut realizes she's pregnant en route to the Red Planet. When the Mars-born boy becomes a teenager, he makes his first journey to Earth.


Genetic study may make ancient Incas quinoa a grain of the future

FILE PHOTO - A man holds quinoa grains at a marketplace for small and medium-sized quinoa growers in Challapata south of La PazBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Quinoa, the sacred "mother grain" of the ancient Inca civilization suppressed by Spanish conquistadors, could become an increasingly important food source in the future thanks to genetic secrets revealed in a new study. Scientists on Wednesday said they have mapped the genome of quinoa and identified a gene that could be manipulated to get rid of the grain's natural bitter taste and pave the way for more widespread commercial use. Quinoa (pronounced KIN-wah) already grows well in harsh conditions such as salty and low-quality soil, high elevations and cool temperatures, meaning it can flourish in locales where common cereal crops like wheat and rice may struggle.


Genetic study may make ancient Inca quinoa a grain of the future

FILE PHOTO - A man holds quinoa grains at a marketplace for small and medium-sized quinoa growers in Challapata south of La PazBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Quinoa, the sacred "mother grain" of the ancient Inca civilization suppressed by Spanish conquistadors, could become an increasingly important food source in the future thanks to genetic secrets revealed in a new study. Scientists on Wednesday said they have mapped the genome of quinoa and identified a gene that could be manipulated to get rid of the grain's natural bitter taste and pave the way for more widespread commercial use. Quinoa (pronounced KIN-wah) already grows well in harsh conditions such as salty and low-quality soil, high elevations and cool temperatures, meaning it can flourish in locales where common cereal crops like wheat and rice may struggle.


Bill Nye's Back! Netflix's New Science Show Promises Nerdy Fun

Bill Nye's Back! Netflix's New Science Show Promises Nerdy FunGet ready science fans: Bill Nye is coming back to the small screen.  


Genetic study may make ancient Inca's quinoa a grain of the future

A Bolivian woman inspects a Quinoa plant, a variety of grain cultivated in high altitudes, during a visit to the area by journalists with the Bolivian government, to promote the International Year of Quinoa in TarmayaBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Quinoa, the sacred "mother grain" of the ancient Inca civilization suppressed by Spanish conquistadors, could become an increasingly important food source in the future thanks to genetic secrets revealed in a new study. Scientists on Wednesday said they have mapped the genome of quinoa and identified a gene that could be manipulated to get rid of the grain's natural bitter taste and pave the way for more widespread commercial use. Quinoa (pronounced KIN-wah) already grows well in harsh conditions such as salty and low-quality soil, high elevations and cool temperatures, meaning it can flourish in locales where common cereal crops like wheat and rice may struggle.


Major global warming study again questioned, again defended

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) CEO Rush Holt, a former Democratic congressman, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, before the House Science Committee. He rebuffed claims by Republican members that federal climate science had been falsified. (AP Photo/Michael Biesecker)WASHINGTON (AP) — Another round of bickering is boiling over about temperature readings used in a 2015 study to show how the planet is warming.


Hunting or Angry? Scientists Can't Agree on Odd Octopus Behavior

Hunting or Angry? Scientists Can't Agree on Odd Octopus BehaviorA wild octopus surprised an Australian diver this week by suddenly, and quite dramatically, inflating itself with water, ballooning up like a parachute. Later, when the diver posted a video of the interaction online, she wondered whether the octopus was trying to intimidate her with its grandiose size. That's possible, marine biologists said, but they can't agree on what caused the curious behavior.


Scientists find crop-destroying caterpillar spreading rapidly in Africa

Agricultural officials spray maize plants affected by armyworms in Keembe districtBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists tracking a crop-destroying caterpillar known as armyworm say it is now spreading rapidly across mainland Africa and could reach tropical Asia and the Mediterranean in the next few years, threatening agricultural trade. In research released on Monday, scientists at the Britain-based Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI) said the pest, which had not previously been established outside the Americas, is now expected to spread "to the limits of suitable African habitat" within a few years.  The caterpillar destroys young maize plants, attacking their growing points and burrowing into the cobs. "It likely travelled to Africa as adults or egg masses on direct commercial flights and has since been spread within Africa by its own strong flight ability and carried as a contaminant on crop produce," said CABI's chief scientist Matthew Cock.


Scientists find crop-destroying caterpillar spreading rapidly in Africa

Officials spray maize plants affected by Armyworms in Keembe district, ZambiaBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists tracking a crop-destroying caterpillar known as armyworm say it is now spreading rapidly across mainland Africa and could reach tropical Asia and the Mediterranean in the next few years, threatening agricultural trade. In research released on Monday, scientists at the Britain-based Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI) said the pest, which had not previously been established outside the Americas, is now expected to spread "to the limits of suitable African habitat" within a few years.  The caterpillar destroys young maize plants, attacking their growing points and burrowing into the cobs. "It likely traveled to Africa as adults or egg masses on direct commercial flights and has since been spread within Africa by its own strong flight ability and carried as a contaminant on crop produce," said CABI's chief scientist Matthew Cock.


Scientists find crop-destroying caterpillar spreading rapidly in Africa

Officials spray maize plants affected by Armyworms in Keembe district, ZambiaBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists tracking a crop-destroying caterpillar known as armyworm say it is now spreading rapidly across mainland Africa and could reach tropical Asia and the Mediterranean in the next few years, threatening agricultural trade. In research released on Monday, scientists at the Britain-based Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI) said the pest, which had not previously been established outside the Americas, is now expected to spread "to the limits of suitable African habitat" within a few years.  The caterpillar destroys young maize plants, attacking their growing points and burrowing into the cobs. "It likely travelled to Africa as adults or egg masses on direct commercial flights and has since been spread within Africa by its own strong flight ability and carried as a contaminant on crop produce," said CABI's chief scientist Matthew Cock.


Macron offers refuge in France to U.S. scientists, entrepreneurs

Head of the political movement En Marche !, or Onwards !, and candidate for the 2017 presidential election Macron, attends a campaign rally in LyonFrench presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron on Saturday called on U.S. scientists, academics and entrepreneurs at odds with Donald Trump's administration to move to France. The former economy minister, one of the frontrunners in the upcoming presidential election, urged U.S.-based scientists working on climate change, renewable energy or health issues who were wary of the new political situation to seek refuge across the Atlantic.


Macron offers refuge in France to U.S. scientists, entrepreneurs

Presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron speaks during a meeting in Lyon, central France, Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017. Untested former budget minister Emmanuel Macron, who rebelled against his Socialist masters to strike out on his own, could end up facing far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen in the second-round vote. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron on Saturday called on U.S. scientists, academics and entrepreneurs at odds with Donald Trump's administration to move to France. The former economy minister, one of the frontrunners in the upcoming presidential election, urged U.S.-based scientists working on climate change, renewable energy or health issues who were wary of the new political situation to seek refuge across the Atlantic.


Macron offers refuge in France to U.S. scientists, entrepreneurs

Head of the political movement En Marche !, or Onwards !, and candidate for the 2017 presidential election Macron, reacts after delivering his speech during a campaign rally in LyonFrench presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron on Saturday called on U.S. scientists, academics and entrepreneurs at odds with Donald Trump's administration to move to France. The former economy minister, one of the frontrunners in the upcoming presidential election, urged U.S.-based scientists working on climate change, renewable energy or health issues who were wary of the new political situation to seek refuge across the Atlantic.


Texas votes to keep science lessons challenging evolution
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Texas Board of Education has moved closer to tweaking — but still preserving — high school science curriculum requirements that teachers and academics say cast doubt on the theory of evolution.

Scientists Untangle the Soy-Breast Cancer Paradox

Scientists Untangle the Soy-Breast Cancer ParadoxYet many doctors recommend that women who have, or are at risk of developing, a common form of breast cancer called estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer  avoid eating soybean-based foods because they contain compounds called isoflavones. Now, in an animal study, researchers at the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, D.C., have uncovered a possible reason for the apparent Jekyll-and-Hyde nature of soy — how it can both prevent cancer and fuel its spread. The researchers found that rats that were given soybean isoflavones to eat throughout their lives — in particular, one type of soybean isoflavone called genistein — had improved immunity against cancer.


Malaria superbugs threaten global malaria control, scientists say
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Multidrug-resistant malaria superbugs have taken hold in parts of Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, threatening to undermine progress against the disease, scientists said. The superbugs - malaria parasites that can beat off the best current treatments, artemisinin and piperaquine - have spread throughout Cambodia, with even fitter multidrug resistant parasites spreading in southern Laos and northeastern Thailand. "We are losing a dangerous race to eliminate artemisinin resistant...malaria before widespread resistance to the partner antimalarials makes that impossible," said Nicholas White, a professor at Oxford University in Britain and Mahidol University in Thailand who co-led the research.

Malaria superbugs threaten global malaria control, scientists say

A Ministry of Public Healthofficial holds blood test slides taken from children who live in Thai-Myanmar border at a malaria clinic in the Sai Yoke districtBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Multidrug-resistant malaria superbugs have taken hold in parts of Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, threatening to undermine progress against the disease, scientists said. The superbugs - malaria parasites that can beat off the best current treatments, artemisinin and piperaquine - have spread throughout Cambodia, with even fitter multidrug resistant parasites spreading in southern Laos and northeastern Thailand. "We are losing a dangerous race to eliminate artemisinin resistant...malaria before widespread resistance to the partner antimalarials makes that impossible," said Nicholas White, a professor at Oxford University in Britain and Mahidol University in Thailand who co-led the research.


Cosmic Neutrino Detector Reveals Clues About Ghostly Particle Masses

Cosmic Neutrino Detector Reveals Clues About Ghostly Particle MassesBuried under the Antarctic ice, the IceCube experiment was designed primarily to capture particles called neutrinos that are produced by powerful cosmic events, but it is also helping scientists learn about the fundamental nature of these ghostly particles. At a meeting of the American Physical Society (APS) in Washington, D.C., this week, scientists with the IceCube collaboration presented new results that contribute to an ongoing mystery about the nature of neutrinos. In particle physics, symmetries often indicate underlying physics that scientists haven't yet unearthed.


Texas mulls changing science standards questioning evolution
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Texas Board of Education will decide whether to scrap a requirement that public schools teach high school students to scrutinize "all sides" of scientific theory after hearing Tuesday from academics who say that was meant to water down lessons on evolution and leave students wondering whether God created the universe.

Pests in South Africa maize "strongly suspected" to be armyworms: scientist

ARMY WORMS ATTACK MAIZE LEAVES IN KENYA.By Ed Stoddard JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - A larvae outbreak which has damaged maize in South Africa's Limpopo and North West provinces is "strongly suspected" to be the invasive armyworm that has attacked crops in neighbouring countries, a scientist said on Monday. The infestation of fall armyworms - an invasive Central American species that is harder to detect and eradicate than its African counterpart - has erupted in Zambia, Zimbabwe and Malawi and follows a crippling El Nino-triggered drought which scorched much of the region last year. Countries with confirmed outbreaks can face import bans on their agricultural products because the armyworm is classified as a quarantine pest.


Pests in South Africa maize "strongly suspected" to be armyworms: scientist

Officials spray maize plants affected by Armyworms in Keembe district, ZambiaBy Ed Stoddard JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - A larvae outbreak which has damaged maize in South Africa's Limpopo and North West provinces is "strongly suspected" to be the invasive armyworm that has attacked crops in neighboring countries, a scientist said on Monday. The infestation of fall armyworms - an invasive Central American species that is harder to detect and eradicate than its African counterpart - has erupted in Zambia, Zimbabwe and Malawi and follows a crippling El Nino-triggered drought which scorched much of the region last year. Countries with confirmed outbreaks can face import bans on their agricultural products because the armyworm is classified as a quarantine pest.


Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk bets 115 million pounds on post-Brexit UK science

The logo of Danish multinational pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk is pictured on the facade of a production plant in ChartresBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Novo Nordisk , the world's top maker of diabetes drugs, is investing 115 million pounds in a new research centre in Britain, undeterred by Brexit. The Danish company said on Monday it would invest the money over 10 years in the centre based at the University of Oxford, which will employ 100 scientists hunting for new ways to treat type 2 diabetes. Britain's vote last year to leave the European Union was disappointing but did not undermine the case for working with a renowned centre of science, said Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen, Novo's chief scientist.


version 1.0 Copyright © 2002-2005 Geimas5